Certain prenatal problems and their relationship with neonate's anthropometric indices at birth

Authors

1 Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, IR Iran

2 Department of midwifery, Faculty of Nursing Midwifery, Bushehr university of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, IR Iran.

3 Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, IR Iran.

4 Department of midwifery, faculty of nursing midwifery, Bushehr university of medical sciences, Bushehr, IR Iran.

5 PhD of Reproductive Health, Assistant Professor, Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, IR Iran.

10.22038/ijp.2020.49906.3983

Abstract

Background and Objective: Fetal development is a strong predictor of neonate's survival after birth.  Investigation of factors that may affect fetal development is important.  The present study aimed to investigate certain prenatal problems and their relationship with neonate's anthropometric indices at birth.
Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional descriptive-analytical study was conducted using records registered in Iran’s Integrated Health System (locally know as SIB), including the records of 616 pregnant mothers who had given birth during 2017-18 in the city of Bushehr (Iran). The registered details of the mothers and infants were reviewed from the first prenatal visit to the first postpartum visit. A checklist was prepared to record the information in their records. The collected data were analyzed in SPSS-19 using appropriate statistical tests at a significance level of p<0.05.
Results: The mothers' mean age was 30.84±5.30 years, 3.9% of infants weighed under 2500 g and were therefore in LBW group. The frequency of anemia was 16.25% and 22.5% respectively in the first and second trimesters. Gestational age (β=0.157, P<0.001), multiparity (β=0.112, P=0.005) and the infant's male gender (β=0.117, P=0.004) had a direct and significant relationship, and vaginal childbirth an inverse and significant relationship (β=-0.122, P=0.003) with the infant's head circumference. Gestational age at birth (β=0.195, P>0.001) and mothers’ body mass Index (BMI) (β=0.241, P>0.001) in the first prenatal visit had a direct and significant relationship with the infant's weight-for-age Z-score. Moreover, GA (β=0.229, P>0.001) and mother's BMI (β=0.242, P>0.001) in the first prenatal visit had a direct and significant relationship with the infant's length-for-age Z-score. The infant's anthropometric indices had no significant relationships with perinatal complications such as anemia, controlled diabetes, and urinary tract infections.
Conclusion: Prenatal complications such as anemia were prevalent in the study population, and required particular attention. The mother's BMI can predict fetal development and should be the focus of greater attention in prenatal clinics. Closer monitoring of maternal anthropometry and increasing mother's knowledge in nutrition by the antenatal clinics would be beneficial for both the mother and the neonate.

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