Pain Management in Children with Collaborative Parents and Healthcare Team

Authors

1 Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

2 Ibn-e-Sina Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

3 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

4 Student Research Committee, School of Health, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

5 Students Research Committee, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Abstract

Most children in hospital have pain. Seeing your child in pain or discomfort is incredibly difficult. Pain in children is a public health concern of major significance in most parts of the world. We have learned that unrelieved pain causes the body to release certain chemicals that may actually delay healing, so it's important to work with child's nurses and doctors to help children for control the pain. On the other side, medication is not the only way to relieve pain. Pain in children should always be managed and pain expression is dependent on the child’s age, cognitive development, and socio cultural context and it is important to pay particular attention to developmental variations in any behavioural manifestations of pain. In this study to explain some ways for parents and healthcare team to manage pain in children.

Keywords


 

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