Effect of Treatment with Vitamin D on Maternal and Neonatal Indices in Pregnant Women with Hypocalcemia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Authors

1 Assistant Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.

2 Associate Professor of Endocrinology, Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.

3 General Practitioner, Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.

4 Professor of Endocrinology, Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.

5 Pathologist, Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.

Abstract

Background
The impact of concomitant vitamin D deficiency and maternal hypocalcemia on fetal growth has is not clear. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of treatment with vitamin D on maternal and neonatal indices in pregnant women with hypocalcemia.
Materials and Methods
This clinical trial was conducted on 110 pregnant women (22-26 weeks of gestational age) with simultaneous mild hypocalcemia (8 < serum calcium< 8.5 mg/dL) and vitamin D deficiency (25 (OH) D< 75 nmol/L).  The study subjects were randomly allocated to intervention (n=55) and control (n=55) groups. In the control group, the subjects were given daily prenatal capsule until delivery. In the intervention group, the subjects were given 50,000 Units vitamin D weekly for eight weeks in addition to prenatal capsules until delivery similar to the control group. At delivery, maternal calcium and 25 (OH) D level and neonatal indices (weight, height, and head circumference) were measured and compared between the groups.
Results
At delivery, mean maternal vitamin D level was 97.5±23.4 nmol/L in the intervention group and 48.9±17.2 nmol/L in the control group, respectively (P<0.001). Mean maternal calcium level in the intervention group was higher than the control group (9.0±0.6 mg/dl vs. 8.8±0.5 mg/dl) but the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Mean neonatal weight, height, and head circumference were not significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05).
Conclusion
In pregnant women with mild hypocalcemia, treatment with vitamin D would not have effect on mean serum calcium and neonatal indices.

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