Risky Decision Making and Impulsivity in Adolescents’ Chess Players: Does Chess Modify or Induce Risky Decisions?

Authors

1 Department of Sport Management, Sport Management Research center, Sport Science Research Institute, Tehran, Iran.

2 Department of Physical Education, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz, Iran.

3 Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Education, Farhangian University, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Objective:Our main goal in this study was to evaluate impulsivity and risky decision making in adolescents’ intermediate-expert chess players and compare them with non-players. We also looked at the relationship between impulsivity and risky decision making in the two groups.
Method: Present study employed a comparative-correlational method which was performed in 2019 in Tehran. Based on previous research, 55 chess players (14-17 years old) and 79 non-players (13-17 years old) participated in the study. Impulsivity was measured by the Go/no-go task and risky decision making was assessed via the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). Independent t-test and Pearson Correlation Coefficient were used for statistical analysis.
Results: There were no significant differences between groups regarding age or education. In the go/no go task, there were significant differences between groups in commission error, omission error and inhibition subscales. In the IGT, the we observed significant differences between groups in net score, raw score and ratio of advantageous/disadvantageous choices subscales. In both groups, net score, raw scores and ratio of advantageous/disadvantageous choices were negatively correlated with commission error. Additionally, omission error was positively correlated with inhibition subscale. We found that the relationship between impulsivity and risky decision making was stronger in non-chess players than chess players.
Conclusion: The results of this study might put chess in the spotlight as an option to improve impulsivity and risky decision making in clinical settings.

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