The Effectiveness of Mother's Recorded Voice on the Pain and Anxiety in Pediatric Undergoing Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study

Authors

1 Nursing and Midwifery College, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

2 Associate Professor, Pediatric Department, Community Nursing Research Center, Nursing and Midwifery College, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

3 MSc, Pediatric Department, Community Nursing Research Center, Nursing and Midwifery College, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

4 Professor, Department of Counseling, Pregnancy Health Research Center, Nursing and Midwifery College, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.

Abstract

Background
Pain and anxiety are the common complications following surgery. The mother's recorded voice can be used to reduce the pain and anxiety. Current research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of the mother's recorded voice on the preoperative anxiety and postoperative pain in children undergoing surgery.
Materials and Methods: This clinical trial study was performed in two groups in the Ali Ebn Abitalib Hospital in Zahedan, Iran in 2019. Eighty children were selected using convenience sampling method and were randomly assigned into intervention group (n=40), and control group (n=40). In the intervention group, the mother's recorded voice was played through the TSCO TH 5335 wireless headphones for 10 min to the child. Anxiety was assessed by modified mYPAS. The pain was assessed 30 min after surgery by the FLACC and one hour after operation by TPPPS. Data were analyzed using software version 22.0.
Results: The mean anxiety in the intervention group after playing mother's voice (52.82 ± 6.90) was significantly lower than before playing the mother's voice (57.12 ± 6.59), (P <0.001). The mean pain 30 min after surgery in intervention group (2.35 ± 1.09) was significantly lower than that in control group (4.9 ± 0.81), (P <0.001). Also, the mean of pain one hour after surgery in the intervention group (2.72 ± 0.716) was significantly lower than that in the control group (4.42 ± 0.675), (P <0.001).
Conclusion
The results suggest that the mother's recorded voice reduced the anxiety before surgery and pain after surgery in children; therefore, we propose that nurses can use the mother's recorded voice to control the pain and anxiety in children.

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